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Anniversary of Ukraine Speech by Giampaolo Silvestri, Secretary General of AVSI Foundation

We cannot forget the Ukrainian children who are living in Eastern Ukraine, in areas under Russian military control. They, too, need support and help. Due to the restrictions (on the movement of humanitarian staff and the blockage of relief supplies across the front line), however, we have no way of knowing how they are, and what they need.

We can’t forget them.

AVSI-USA Visits Ukrainian Refugees in Poland and Romania

Barbara Gagliotti shares the story of Dona Maria. Dona Maria, an elderly woman, and her disabled husband were boarded unto a bus in Zaporizhzhia and transported to Romania, leaving everything and everyone they knew behind.  We met Dona Maria during a visit to AVSI-USA supported activities in Poland and Romania as part of our emergency campaign on behalf of Ukrainian refugees. Read more.

The Power of the Gift of Giving: How AVSI-USA Friends From Around the World Came Together to Fundraise for Our Partners

The Spring of 2022 will always be a reminder of the darkness of the Ukrainian Crisis, but it will also represent the incredible generosity of our donors. This unexpected wave of contributions taught us that the act of giving transforms us: it fulfills an innate human desire, immerses us in hope, and renews our motivation to love selflessly.

Updates from the Frontlines in Ukraine

It is freezing in Ukraine. Thousands have been sleeping in subway stations and makeshift bunkers to protect themselves from bombs. For over a million people, the time has come to flee. Across the eastern part of the country, women, children and the elderly daily board any bus or train they can find heading west and south, either to cities like Lviv (Leopoli) near the Polish border, or continuing further into Poland, Romania, and Moldova. How long will they be gone?

Witness from Ukraine

Living in an orphanage in Ukraine is usually a traumatizing experience, even in peaceful times. Estimates put the number of youth in orphan care in the country at about 90,000. The majority are social orphans, meaning they have been placed in institutions because their parents could not care for them on account of extreme poverty, abuse, or abandonment. Around age 16, orphans must leave the boarding schools or other care institutions because state funding runs out. Yet, having spent their whole lives without parental love and care, most are woefully unprepared for independent adult living.

Ukraine Emergency #HELPUKRAINE

Since the outbreak of the conflict in Ukraine on February 24, thousands have fled their homes, crossing borders to find refuge with family and friends in neighboring countries. AVSI-USA asks you to join us in this urgent appeal so we can respond quickly and directly to help Ukrainians fleeing from war.

Stories of new beginnings: Abandoned at Birth, Olena now Tutors Other Girls with Disabilities

We are talking on Skype. After all, I am in Washington DC, and she is in Kharkiv, Ukraine. Wearing a beanie covering most of her hair, 28-years-old Olena Kuts looks away from the camera and laughs when I explain why I wanted to interview her: to learn more about her life.

“It’s a long story,” jokes Olena.

And not an easy one. Born with Phocomelia, a condition that involves arm and leg malformations, Olena was abandoned by her parents when she was just two days old. Soon after, she was sent to a local orphanage, where she lived for six years. Lena doesn’t like to look back at those first years of her life.